media platforms – Handful Of Hate http://handfulofhate.com/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 20:30:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://handfulofhate.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png media platforms – Handful Of Hate http://handfulofhate.com/ 32 32 EXCLUSIVE Facebook will temporarily allow posts calling for violence against Russians, calls for Putin’s death https://handfulofhate.com/exclusive-facebook-will-temporarily-allow-posts-calling-for-violence-against-russians-calls-for-putins-death/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 21:49:00 +0000 https://handfulofhate.com/exclusive-facebook-will-temporarily-allow-posts-calling-for-violence-against-russians-calls-for-putins-death/ The Facebook logo is placed on a Russian flag in this illustration photo taken February 26, 2022. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration/File Photo Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com Register March 10 (Reuters) – Meta Platforms (FB.O) will allow Facebook and Instagram users in certain countries to call for violence against Russians and Russian soldiers amid […]]]>

The Facebook logo is placed on a Russian flag in this illustration photo taken February 26, 2022. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration/File Photo

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March 10 (Reuters) – Meta Platforms (FB.O) will allow Facebook and Instagram users in certain countries to call for violence against Russians and Russian soldiers amid the invasion of Ukraine, according to internal emails seen by Reuters on Thursday, in a temporary change to its hate speech policy.

The social media company is also temporarily allowing certain posts calling for the death of Russian President Vladimir Putin or Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko in countries including Russia, Ukraine and Poland, according to a series of internal emails to its content moderators. .

These calls for the death of leaders will be allowed unless they contain other targets or have two credibility indicators, such as location or method, an email said, in a recent modification of company rules on violence and incitement.

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The emails state that calls for violence against Russians are allowed when the message clearly speaks of the invasion of Ukraine. They said calls for violence against Russian soldiers were allowed because it was used as a proxy for the Russian military, and said it would not apply to prisoners of war.

Meta did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

The temporary policy changes apply to Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Poland, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, Russia and Ukraine.

Last week, Russia said it was banning Facebook in the country in response to what it said were restrictions on access to Russian media on the platform. Moscow has cracked down on tech companies, including Twitter (TWTR.N), which said it was restricted in the country, during its invasion of Ukraine, which it calls a “special operation”.

Many major social media platforms announced new content restrictions around the conflict, including blocking Russian state media RT and Sputnik in Europe, and demonstrated exclusions in some of their policies during the war.

The emails also showed that Meta would allow praise from the right-wing Azov Battalion, which is normally prohibited, in a change first reported by The Intercept.

Meta spokesman Joe Osborne previously said the company “is making a narrow exception at this time for commendations of the Azov Regiment strictly in the context of the defense of Ukraine or its role in the Guard.” Ukrainian National”.

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Reporting by Munsif Vengattil in New Delhi and Elizabeth Culliford in New York; edited by Kenneth Li and Jonathan Oatis

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Stop AAPI Hate Sponsors New Legislation – Golden Gate Xpress https://handfulofhate.com/stop-aapi-hate-sponsors-new-legislation-golden-gate-xpress/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 04:40:17 +0000 https://handfulofhate.com/stop-aapi-hate-sponsors-new-legislation-golden-gate-xpress/ Welcome to Gator Talk, a collaborative CalState podcast that brings citywide and statewide perspectives to SF state news. Last month, new California legislation was introduced to help prevent harassment in public places. The non-profit organization Stop AAPI Hate sponsored both bills, with a third similar bill being finalized. Myron Caringal, Diversity Editor and Guest, sat […]]]>

Welcome to Gator Talk, a collaborative CalState podcast that brings citywide and statewide perspectives to SF state news.

Last month, new California legislation was introduced to help prevent harassment in public places. The non-profit organization Stop AAPI Hate sponsored both bills, with a third similar bill being finalized. Myron Caringal, Diversity Editor and Guest, sat down with State SF Professor and Stop AAPI Hate Co-Founder Dr. Russell Jeung.

Check out the story here at Gator Talk.

TRANSCRIPTION:

Introduction

Chris: Happy Friday, Alligators! Meet Chris Ramirez, editor and your host for Gatortalk, the podcast where honestly, T-Pump Tuesdays are the only thing that gets us through the week. With me today is Myron Caringal, Diversity Editor at Xpress and today’s guest.

Myron: Hello, everyone.

Chris: For more news/coverage check goldengatexpress.org OR @GGXnews on all social media platforms.

Preview of the show

Chris: Today’s main story focuses on two new California bills introduced last month that aim to help prevent harassment and discrimination in public places. Myron sat down with Stop AAPI Hate co-founder and SF State own Dr. Russell Jeung.

So let’s go.

main story

Chris: Xpress featured Dr. Jeung on Gator Talk last semester when he was named one of TIME Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People of the Year. Side note: if you haven’t listened to this episode, you probably should. But anyway, Myron, what has Dr. Jeung been up to since the last time we had him on the show?

Myron: When we last had him on the show, Dr. Jeung was on sabbatical working full-time for Stop AAPI Hate and doing other research. Dr. Jeung published a national report with Stop AAPI Hate and wrote an article with SF State students about the nonprofit organization’s youth campaign. He’s back to teaching now – but his main job is still with Stop AAPI Hate.

Cris: Interesting. Tell me more about this report.

Myron: The report found that approximately one in five Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders experienced a hate incident from March 2020 to September 2021. This equates to nearly five million AAPI people experiencing racism worldwide country.

Chris: Hmm. And that only takes reported incidents into account, right?

Myron: That’s right. So it may not even be close to the actual number.

Myron: Most hate incidents were in the form of verbal harassment and avoidance, while physical harassment was the third most reported. The majority of these incidents occur in public places, such as streets and businesses.

Myron: And 62% of all reports…come from women.

Chris: So Myron, how do these findings translate into legislation?

Myron: There are two bills, both sponsored by Stop AAPI Hate. The first bill, SB-1161, focuses on preventing street harassment in transit districts.

[interview audio begins]

Jeung: So eight percent of cases of racist incidents happen in public transportation, like Muni and BART, and we are concerned about passenger safety. Most transit systems think of rider safety in terms of physical safety, like avoiding accidents, but for us, rider safety means being safe from harassment and assault. And so this bill would require the 10 major transit agencies to consider and study the safety of their riders and it is co-sponsored by the Los Angeles subway system.

[interview audio ends]

Myron: So the bill would require the top 10 transit agencies to collect ridership data – data based on things like race, sex, gender identity, age and sexual orientation – and to study the harassment suffered in relation to the data. Agencies should then create initiatives based on the data they have collected to help prevent harassment on public transport.

Chris: Since SF State is largely a suburban school, I’m curious: Are any San Francisco transit agencies included in this study?

Myron: According to the 2020 UCLA report, Transit Blues in the Golden Stateit would include Muni, BART and CalTrain.

Chris: And what about the second bill?

Myron: The second bill, AB 2549, was co-drafted by Asian, African American, and Latino lawmakers — all people of color — and it aims to prevent street harassment by approaching it as an issue of public health.

Chris: It’s interesting that it’s a public health issue. What is the reasoning behind this?

Myron: Well, it can be complicated to criminalize verbal harassment — criminalizing it just isn’t feasible. So, instead of trying to enforce and punish people for harassment, this bill would include street harassment in the state’s public health code and address it as such.

[interview audio beings]

Jeung: By doing so, by defining it in the public health code and encouraging the public health department to raise awareness about it, I think it’s an effective way to educate the community about our societal standards in California. Yeah, so I think, again, it’s really innovative in that it takes a public health approach to racism, and it defines bullying as evil, and it seeks to change the norms about our treatment of women and other groups.

[interview audio ends]

Myron: And if passed, starting next year would require the California Department of Public Health to conduct a five-year, statewide public campaign to raise awareness of street harassment and, by extension, preventing and mitigating the problem.

— Chris: We’re going to take a little break —

Break

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[break ends]

Main Story Suite

Chris: Myron, you told me earlier that the texts of the bills focus heavily on harassment against women of color. Why was it important to include this in the act?

Myron: Well, Dr. Jeung said that…

[interview audio begins]

Dr. Jeung: There has been a consistent trend of women reporting harassment twice as much as men, and we know that women and women of color are particularly vulnerable to this harassment. We have therefore proposed all our legislation to combat sexual harassment.

Dr. Jeung: We find that Asian American women are disproportionately affected, but we know that this issue affects other women of color and women in general and other vulnerable populations. So we build coalitions by having them sponsored by women legislators of color and trying to promote safety for all.

[interview audio ends]

Chris: And what does the timeline look like for these bills?

Myron: It might take some time, but with the growing awareness of anti-Asian racism, Dr. Jeung hopes the three will be successful this year.

Chris: There’s a third bill?

Myron: Well, not yet. It is being finalized and he hopes it will be presented soon. It will focus on the prevention of harassment in large companies.

[interview audio begins]

Dr. Jeung: Basically, the idea is that customers experience a lot of harassment in stores, as do workers. That’s why we’re looking for employers to protect their employees and customers from this type of harassment. And the idea is to do this by alerting managers on how to fight against harassment and by setting up signage.

But the general idea is that we want to force large companies to once again protect the safety of their workers and employees against harassment and the safety of customers against harassment.

[interview audio ends]

Myron: This should protect a lot of marginalized populations since they constitute a large part of the working class. But, we’ll have to wait and see what the bill really entails when it’s officially introduced.

[interview audio begins]

Dr. Jeung: The racism that Asian Americans experience isn’t all hate crimes, hate crimes you could get arrested for, they’re just a fraction of what’s going on.

And so what we’re trying to do is expand civil rights for Asians and everyone else, and then proactively promote government protection of those rights. So I think this legislation is kind of innovative in that it expands civil rights, it recognizes the gender-based violence that women and other communities face, and covers more of the racism that Asians have experienced during COVID -19 than the simple crime.

[interview audio ends]

Chris: In the meantime, what next for Stop AAPI Hate?

[interview audio begins]

Dr. Jeung: We will try to continue to expand our civil rights, this is an area we are working on. Second, we really want to develop ethnic studies. We are therefore organizing a national summit in June. We are going to offer a toolkit for people who want to organize for ethnic studies. Again, we really want to highlight the great heritage of the state of San Francisco and its emphasis on the racial experiences of people of color. And so we’re going to promote that. And then, third, we will continue to work to promote community safety in a non-prison, non-police way.

[interview audio ends]

Myron: Dr. Jeung said Stop AAPI Hate is rooted in the legacy of the Third World Liberation Front and the Black Student Union strike of the 1960s, and he hopes to continue that legacy through his work with the non-profit organization and with the help of SF State students.

Brief news

Chris: Here are some other things that happened this week:

The California Supreme Court on Thursday denied a request by UC Berkeley to freeze its enrollment, forcing it to cut 3,000 admissions slots for the next academic year. The move comes after a Berkeley neighborhood group filed a lawsuit against the university, claiming its enrollment expansion plan failed to consider environmental impact.

The CSU Board of Trustees announced Wednesday that it will hire a third-party law firm to conduct an investigation into former Chancellor Joseph I. Castro and Fresno State University. The board also said it would conduct a Title IX assessment and the assessment would begin this month.

To finish

And that’s all I have! Meet Chris Ramirez, editor and your host for GatorTalk.

New episodes will air every other weekend, so keep an eye out.

And with that, I go out.

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Why Social Media Can Be A Double-Edged Sword For Athletes | Sports | German football and major international sports news | DW https://handfulofhate.com/why-social-media-can-be-a-double-edged-sword-for-athletes-sports-german-football-and-major-international-sports-news-dw/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 13:26:32 +0000 https://handfulofhate.com/why-social-media-can-be-a-double-edged-sword-for-athletes-sports-german-football-and-major-international-sports-news-dw/ Zhu Yi, the Los Angeles-born figure skater who decided in 2018 to represent China, nearly crashed into the wall when she failed to land a jump in the short program at the Winter Olympics from Beijing in 2022. She avoided physical pain in this case, but not mental pain. The hashtag #ZhuYiFellDown has been viewed […]]]>

Zhu Yi, the Los Angeles-born figure skater who decided in 2018 to represent China, nearly crashed into the wall when she failed to land a jump in the short program at the Winter Olympics from Beijing in 2022. She avoided physical pain in this case, but not mental pain.

The hashtag #ZhuYiFellDown has been viewed more than 200 million times in a few hours on Weibo, the Chinese equivalent of Twitter. “What everyone said on the internet really touched me,” she told Chinese news agency Xinhua. “The problem now is psychological.”

Sign that the authorities wanted to maintain a positive message around the Olympics, the hashtag disappeared. Weibo says it has banned more than 2,000 accounts and deleted more than 71,000 posts over online abuse against Olympic athletes.

But the problem doesn’t just go away. Cyberbullying is part of the daily life of many athletes.

A study by World Athletics during the Tokyo Olympics revealed alarming levels of abuse towards athletes, including sexist, racist, transphobic and homophobic posts, as well as unfounded doping accusations.

World Athletics chairman Sebastian Coe described the “worrying levels” of online abuse uncovered by the study as “unfathomable” for the athletes targeted.

“This research is disturbing in many ways, but what strikes me most is that abuse targets people who celebrate and share their performance and talent as a way to inspire and motivate people,” said he declared.

Female athletes were the target of 87% of recorded abuse – a familiar sentiment for Canadian tennis player Rebecca Marino. The 31-year-old Vancouverite retired from the sport in 2013 at the age of 22, citing abuse of social media as the main reason for her retirement.

Canadian Rebecca Marino reacts during the 2011 French Open

“Early in my professional career, I found it very difficult to ignore these messages,” Marino told DW. “These comments would be demeaning; comments about appearance, performance, something about your family, and of course lots of swearing that goes with it.”

Inspired by her late father Joe, Marino made a comeback in 2019. Marino says she still limits her phone time and sometimes hides some apps from her home screen, but feels social media platforms are starting to put in implement changes to protect users.

“In these days, social media platforms help athletes manage and limit comments, and athletes have become much more savvy about how to protect themselves,” Marino said. “I now have a strong sense of identity and self-confidence, and my self-worth is not tied to my social media. It’s something I’ve been working really hard on.”

According to Marino, there is definitely room for improvement for social media platforms, and she would rather have a proactive approach to dealing with negative comments than a reactive approach. Relying solely on the individual to protect themselves does not work.

Non-profit organizations such as “Cybersmile” were created specifically to fight against all forms of online bullying and abuse. Liverpool captain Jordan Henderson sought to draw attention to the problem by handing over control of his social media accounts to the cyberbullying charity last year.

Marino says the benefits of social media far outweigh the drawbacks, but the former WTA world No. 38 still describes online abuse as an “unfortunate new reality that we have to deal with”.

Limaye: “I started to hate my body”

Shireen Limaye, the captain of India’s women’s basketball team, has had to face this new reality on more than one occasion. Limaye opened up about how she was bullied and body-shamed after her team’s loss to Japan in the FIBA ​​Women’s Asia Cup 2021 – and faced such comments throughout of her career.

“It started the second I started playing basketball for India,” Limaye told DW. “I noticed people kept saying pathetic things that hurt me. I got direct messages saying I was too fat and looked like a fat villain.”

His performance on the pitch didn’t seem to be affected, but the abuse really hurt.

“It troubled me a lot, I had depression for a while until I told my family about it,” the 27-year-old said. “I started doubting myself and hating my body. I was literally ashamed of my fat.”

The role of social media platforms

While Limaye and Marino said they never considered deleting their social media accounts in light of the online attacks, Eritrea’s first Winter Olympian, Shannon Abeda, said after the Games from Pyeongchang in 2018, he had wondered whether he should maintain his online presence.

But should the responsibility for online harassment be left to the victims of such attacks? The 25-year-old Canadian alpine skier, who declared Eritrean citizenship in 2011 and has since competed in the Olympics in Pyeongchang in 2018 and Beijing in 2022, disagrees with Marino’s view that platforms social media companies have implemented positive changes.

“They have algorithms and a huge number of people, and they don’t even want to bother doing it,” Abeda told DW. “I personally reported horrible comments directed at Mikaela Shiffrin the other day and Twitter just said they found no violation.”

Olympia I Shannon-Ogbani Abeda I Eritrea

Skier Shannon Abeda leads the Eritrean team at the 2018 Winter Olympics

Social media platforms such as Twitter say they are doing all they can to help and will continue to improve.

Abeda admitted that while some of the comments almost pushed him to do better, the majority of them had a negative impact on his performance, especially at Pyeongchang 2018.

“I didn’t feel safe in my sport,” he said. “I thought if I crashed people were going to attack me more for not finishing. I’m just going to feel more hate.”

Edited by: Mark Meadows

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Malawi: Ministry of National Unity calls for peaceful co-existence after hate speech against Asian Malawians https://handfulofhate.com/malawi-ministry-of-national-unity-calls-for-peaceful-co-existence-after-hate-speech-against-asian-malawians/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 12:24:27 +0000 https://handfulofhate.com/malawi-ministry-of-national-unity-calls-for-peaceful-co-existence-after-hate-speech-against-asian-malawians/ In what appears to be a reaction to political, economic and social rights activist Ken Msonda’s statement accusing people of Asian descent of posing as Malawians because they hold dual nationality, the Ministry of National Unity intervened, saying it amounted to promoting hate speech; racist violence and xenophobic remarks. In a statement, Minister Timothy Mtambo […]]]>

In what appears to be a reaction to political, economic and social rights activist Ken Msonda’s statement accusing people of Asian descent of posing as Malawians because they hold dual nationality, the Ministry of National Unity intervened, saying it amounted to promoting hate speech; racist violence and xenophobic remarks.

In a statement, Minister Timothy Mtambo said that while recognizing the right to peaceful protest in accordance with Chapter 4, Section 38 of the Constitution of the Republic of Malawi, the ministry also appeals “to all against incitement to racially motivated violence and all forms of discrimination”.

“Let us remember that Malawi is governed by laws and everything we do must be done within the bounds of the law.”

Msonda released a voice note on social media explosively pleading with Malawians to stand firm with Anti-Corruption Bureau (ACB) Director General Martha Chizuma, who has been sued by corruption suspect Ashok Kumar Streedharan for alleged defamation.

Msonda argued that these suspects, who are of Asian descent, should be treated as posing as Malawians since they hold dual nationality, but they claim the UK as their homeland with Malawi as just a base. to “steal” government money by illegal means.

Minister Mtambo is becoming aware that this has led to multiple attacks flooding social media platforms.

“The right to freedom of opinion and expression is sacred to all of us, in accordance with Articles 34 and 35 respectively,” Mtambo said. “However, we must simultaneously exercise these freedoms with great caution without having to infringe the human rights and freedoms of others, including the right to economic activity in article 29, and the right to citizenship as stipulated in Article 47 of the Constitution.

“Having a problem with one or two members of a group should not equate to profiling the entire race of Malawian-Asian descent. Citizens are encouraged to respect the rule of law and always allow due process regular to follow its course.

Mtambo therefore calls on the general public, protest organizers and all peace-loving Malawians “to refrain from using statements that could incite racial violence against fellow Asians and the Asian business community.” .

“In the same vein, Asian Malawians are advised to avoid provocative responses that could lead to unnecessary further tension – two wrongs don’t make a right.

“The ministry engages with all relevant stakeholders and takes all necessary steps to ensure that any kind of dispute and misunderstanding is always resolved amicably and in a timely manner.

“The mandate of the ministry is to foster and prioritize peace and dialogue,” says Mtambo while strongly condemning all forms of hate speech and discrimination in accordance with Article 20 of the Constitution of the Republic of Malawi .

“We call on the general public to always refrain from hate speech, provocative statements and any conduct that may cause disunity. As peace-loving Malawians, we are all obliged to coexist peacefully and express our opinions. , feelings and beliefs without necessarily infringing on the human rights of others.

“As a people, we all have the right to exist, to conduct legally accepted business and to live here in Malawi as stipulated in Article 29 of the Constitution of the Republic of Malawi.

“Racial profiling, xenophobic statements, discrimination and incitement to violence all amount to breaking the law. Let us embrace peaceful co-existence and unity as a catalyst for national development and prosperity in line with the Malawi Development Vision 2063, because no country can develop without peace and unity.”

Ms Msonda assured the public that concerned Malawians have stepped up to protect Chizuma and his office and implored the judiciary not to entertain any suspected corrupt individual to seek judicial interventions.

Meanwhile, social rights activists Joshua Chisa Mbele and Levi Luwemba have called for legal protests at Ashok’s home on Wednesday March 12.