Hate Page – Handful Of Hate http://handfulofhate.com/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 22:10:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://handfulofhate.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Hate Page – Handful Of Hate http://handfulofhate.com/ 32 32 World Surf League Chief Strategist Dave Prodan reacts to the torrent of hate surrounding the redesigned tour: “The reality is that our viewership numbers have never been higher, which is the value of the platform. .” https://handfulofhate.com/world-surf-league-chief-strategist-dave-prodan-reacts-to-the-torrent-of-hate-surrounding-the-redesigned-tour-the-reality-is-that-our-viewership-numbers-have-never-been-higher-which-is-the-value-of/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 16:31:27 +0000 https://handfulofhate.com/world-surf-league-chief-strategist-dave-prodan-reacts-to-the-torrent-of-hate-surrounding-the-redesigned-tour-the-reality-is-that-our-viewership-numbers-have-never-been-higher-which-is-the-value-of/ Remove. Technology, design, science and science fiction noted Gizmodo turned its steely gaze to our humble surf space a few days ago in a broad feature that aimed to name “the best surfboards, wetsuits and accessories for surfing”. Now when I came across the title, specifically the word ‘accessories’, I was pretty sure the ‘best […]]]>

Remove.

Technology, design, science and science fiction noted Gizmodo turned its steely gaze to our humble surf space a few days ago in a broad feature that aimed to name “the best surfboards, wetsuits and accessories for surfing”. Now when I came across the title, specifically the word ‘accessories’, I was pretty sure the ‘best surfboard’ would be Gerry Lopez’s Costco special and so you can imagine my shock when the weight fight heavy hit John John Florence. shaper Jon Pyzel and Kolohe Andino meister Matt Biolos.

The winner?

Pizel.

Gizmod wrote:

Many professional surfers use Pyzel boards, and so for years I stayed away, thinking they were too advanced for me. That might be true for some of their shapes, but the Phantom (6’1″ round tail version) surprised me by being one of the friendliest boards I’ve ever tried. It paddles incredibly well and is very stable underfoot.It has a ton of ride going down the line, but it also turns effortlessly.

I’ve used this board in everything from 2-3 foot beach slops to 6+ foot straight spike runs, and the board hasn’t blinked an eye. In other words, it can crawl (i.e. catch small, weak waves) quite well, but can still hold a line when things get critical. It is also good with steep and late drops. I went with the five fin version so I could fly it as a thruster (three fins) or a quad (four fins). It’s so versatile that if I could only have one board it would probably be this one. When things start to get into the double overhead range (8ft+) you’ll probably want to up the ante, and I actually found a 6’6″ Pyzel tank for $300 on Craigslist that I use for these big days. But for everyday conditions, the Phantom is a dream.

Biolos did not leave the ring empty-handed as his Lost + Lib Tech Quiver Killer was named Best Travel Board.

Good enough.

7till8 won the award for best wetsuit, Roark won the boardshort category and Dryrobe Advanced Long Sleeve won the award for best changing dress.

Do you use a changing robe?

Neither do I.

Celebrate the rest of the winners here.

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Who is the real Huddy? – Rolling Stone https://handfulofhate.com/who-is-the-real-huddy-rolling-stone/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 15:18:32 +0000 https://handfulofhate.com/who-is-the-real-huddy-rolling-stone/ The pop punk revival is alive and well, but it’s not just the return of veterans. Young artists like Huddy are trying to become genre stars, and thanks to his new single “All the Things I Hate About You”, the 20-year-old could just do well. Huddy, born Chase Hudson and formerly known as Lil Huddy […]]]>

The pop punk revival is alive and well, but it’s not just the return of veterans. Young artists like Huddy are trying to become genre stars, and thanks to his new single “All the Things I Hate About You”, the 20-year-old could just do well.

Huddy, born Chase Hudson and formerly known as Lil Huddy online, got his start on TikTok. He was a member of the infamous Hype House before launching his music career last year with his debut album teenage broken heart.

Like many great songs, Huddy’s latest single gets a major boost from some of the dramas it came from. During the Hype House era, Huddy dated TikTok It Girl Charli D’Amelio. They had a rocky relationship until this year when she started dating Landon Barker, son of Travis Barker. (For an added dose of melodrama, the elder Barker produced Huddy’s debut album.)

“All the Things I Hate About You,” and the love triangle it’s about, caused a stir online and may have launched a potential hit for Huddy. It helps that the song is incredibly catchy with some of the best burns you can shout at, like calling her ex a “homie hopper” and referring to the new beau as a “bum star.”

Huddy stopped by the latest episode of Don’t let this flop to talk about the budding success of his song, whether the song’s supposed topics were strained and what it was like to be on his very first tour.

How does it feel to see “All the Things I Hate About You” explode? Were you surprised at the attention it got?
It was wonderful. I really like that. It is a kind of translation with many people. A lot of people have been able to find their own connection to it and seeing that connecting with people both online and recently on tour has been amazing for me.

What’s the most surprising reaction you’ve had to the song?
I feel like the most surprising thing for me is when you see kids getting interested in your music. I think it’s really strange for me.

Can you tell us about the process of writing the song and how it went?

So when I wrote the song, it happened in early June. I had had a session with two people. I had never done a session with it before. And I told them the concept I had for a song called “All the Things I Hate About You” and we went in and we just did it and we took that first day. Then we came back a second day – having never done a session before booking another session the next day – and then we finished the song. It was just such a quick process. I’ve never seen a song move so fast.

Did the topics of the song mean anything to you?
No not yet. I’ve been a bit isolated recently during the whole process of my tour and I’ve been working a lot. I’m home and I haven’t really spoken to anyone since the beginning of the summer, really

Could you explain the term “homie hopper” to our listeners who may not be familiar with it?

I guess in the definition it’s a person jumping from friend to friend.

You were first recognized on TikTok. Has the take-off of your music career affected your opinion of the app?

I still love TikTok. It has a special place in my heart, but I really found a new love for music and a kind of exploration of the world. It’s a big commitment. And so I spent almost the whole year staying in the studio. It’s fun to really explore it. It’s such a creative world. It’s like painting your own video game in a way. Your creative levels truly have no limits in a studio. So it’s fun to really experiment. See what happens.

What’s on your For You page right now?
I’ll be honest, probably 75% of that is live performances by artists. I see their new music. I see modifications of them. I see pictures of them. That’s mostly what’s on my For You page. And then a lot of stupid jokes, like a lot of stupid humor.

Any artists in particular?

Playboi Carti, you can’t escape him. He is too good. Every time he does a live show, he’ll see it in a hundred different places. Every time he goes to a fashion show, you see that everywhere, just that kind of stuff. Lots of fashion inspiration.

Next month you will play When We Were Young, your first festival set. Are you excited?

Well, I just finished my first tour on Saturday, so I feel like that prepared me for what to expect at my first festival. I feel like going straight into my first festival might be a bit more nerve-wracking, but I feel like I’m well prepared for it. Now I’m ready to take it head on. I’m really excited for this.

What surprised you the most when you were on the road for the first time?

I think the thing that surprised me the most was probably the lack of sleep. I thought because you’re playing for such a small part of the day, it wouldn’t take up too much of your day, but it really does take up your whole day. Even like loading, setting up, setting up merchandising booths, preparing your voice, doing all the pre-show stuff, that’s a lot. And then after that, we usually left town right away. Like right after the show, we were going to the next town. It was so fast that I had no idea I would get used to it so easily. It was very tiring.

When did you decide to drop the “Lil” from your stage name?

There was a thought that I was getting older and transcending the music world a bit and felt like I was taken more seriously. It was time to drop “Lil” from my name just so I could show a different side to what people have seen of me so far. I want them to know me now as Huddy, the artist. I try to make this transition really easy for everyone.

What’s the side of you that people haven’t seen yet?

I don’t think people have seen the real raw version of myself. I think people will get that from music. I thought that by removing “Lil” from my name you would understand that I was a bit more grown up and ready to show the world who I am and not take the reality out of it. I want to be one hundred percent authentic on every level when it comes to my music.

Don’t let this flop is released Wednesdays on all audio streaming platforms, including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, Stitcher and more.

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Is a technology company always neutral? Cloudflare’s latest controversy shows why the answer is no. https://handfulofhate.com/is-a-technology-company-always-neutral-cloudflares-latest-controversy-shows-why-the-answer-is-no/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 13:31:41 +0000 https://handfulofhate.com/is-a-technology-company-always-neutral-cloudflares-latest-controversy-shows-why-the-answer-is-no/ Jenna Ruddock is a Research Fellow with the Technology and Social Change Project and April Glaser is a Senior Internet Policy Research Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School’s Shorenstein Center. It’s time to take a hard look at Internet infrastructure policy Infrastructure rarely makes the headlines – until it fails. Internet infrastructure is no exception. But […]]]>

Jenna Ruddock is a Research Fellow with the Technology and Social Change Project and April Glaser is a Senior Internet Policy Research Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School’s Shorenstein Center.

It’s time to take a hard look at Internet infrastructure policy

Infrastructure rarely makes the headlines – until it fails. Internet infrastructure is no exception. But last month, Cloudflare – a popular internet infrastructure company providing a range of services from domain name support to cybersecurity and content delivery – was reluctantly (again) lured under the spotlights. The problem was not a broken pipe or a cyberattack targeting its network or its customers, but rather the fact that Cloudflare continued to protect one of its customer websites despite overwhelming evidence of persistent online harassment and abuse and offline perpetrated by the community of users of the site. (The website in question will not be named by this article in order to avoid harassment or direct readers to its content.)

Flag. To block. To suspend. Demonetize. Most of us are familiar with the range of tactics major social media platforms use to moderate online content, and the confusion and challenges that have resulted from erratic efforts to arbitrate user-generated content at large. ladder. The Internet’s Facebook and YouTube have proven ineffective in preventing the online communities they host from engaging in harmful behavior, including incitement to violence. The prospect of internet infrastructure companies that aren’t directly involved in the social media business making decisions about what’s okay and what’s not to keep online is even more difficult.

But the stakes are just as high: consider Cloudflare’s decision in 2019 to stop providing services to 8chan, a website well-known for its violent extremism and explicitly white supremacist content. That year, three mass shooters posted their hateful manifestos on 8chan before opening fire. Seventy-five people died from these shots, with 141 casualties in total. Even immediately after the third attack – in El Paso, Texas – Cloudflare initially said it would not stop providing services to 8chan. A few hours later, following public outrage and bad press, Cloudflare ended its technical support for the site.

So how should we think about online infrastructure companies and their responsibilities to combat damage caused by websites using their services?

Social media sites that encourage people to post content have more targeted tools to moderate that content, such as flagging or deleting a problematic post or banning an individual’s page. But companies that provide internet infrastructure services like web hosting or domain name services usually have much less granular options available to them. They are often limited to direct actions such as deleting entire web pages or blocking entire domains. Governments are increasingly turning to infrastructure providers such as ISPs in an effort to disrupt internet access for entire regions in times of unrest.

For those who would rather see a company like Cloudflare stay entirely out of the content moderation game – well, that ship has sailed.

For those who would rather see a company like Cloudflare stay entirely out of the content moderation game, well, that ship has sailed. From top to bottom of the “stack”, internet infrastructure services have repeatedly made unilateral decisions to take down entire websites – Cloudflare is not alone. When Cloudflare ditched the neo-Nazi website daily storm in 2017, Google, which was the site’s domain registrar, and GoDaddy, the site’s web host, also did so. Largely hidden from public view, however, these decisions rarely make headlines unless they are prompted by sustained public outcry. And it’s rare for Internet infrastructure companies to proactively cite clear pre-existing guidelines or policies when taking action in these cases. The result: a record of ad hoc, reactive decision-making that is often so opaque and inconsistent that it’s hard for anyone outside of business to imagine better solutions to these thorny policy issues.

In a recent blog post, Cloudflare management offered what some have found to be a compelling analogy to defend the company’s stern reluctance, and sometimes outright refusal, to part ways with websites with long histories of harm. . In its role as a website security service provider, the company claims, Cloudflare is a lot like a fire department. Therefore, refusing to provide services to a website based on the content of that website would be tantamount to refusing to respond to a fire because the accommodation belonged to someone of “insufficient character”.

Without going too deep into this specific analogy, there are two glaring problems with comparing most Internet infrastructure providers to any community-rooted utility they serve. The first and most obvious problem is that the vast majority of Internet infrastructure providers are for-profit corporations with no comparable regime of public oversight and accountability. While these Internet infrastructure companies may rightly position themselves and their services as valuable and even integral to the Internet as a whole, their most concrete obligations are ultimately to their paying customers and, most importantly, , their owners or shareholders.

Often the provision of infrastructure services is positioned as a neutral default – only the denial of these services is framed as a political choice.

But the second, more nuanced distinction concerns how we identify rights and harms at stake. Often the provision of infrastructure services is positioned as a neutral default – only the denial of these services is framed as a political choice. Or in other words: refuse services to websites or forums that promote or have been directly linked to violence has been easily framed as a potential denial of rights and therefore an affront to the “free and open internet”. But when a company chooses to Continue provide services even with hard evidence that a site is being used to promote hate and abuse, it is generally not treated as a threat to the overall health of the internet in the same way. As legal scholar Danielle Citron has noted, however, online abuse itself “jeopardizes freedom of expression” – particularly by silencing “women, minorities and political dissidents”, who are disproportionately targeted online.

Infrastructure companies themselves have championed this idea of ​​neutrality, and in the absence of support from law enforcement or the courts, calls to action from targeted individuals and communities are too often reduced to subjective content or policy disagreements. The Cloudflare analogy provides just one example here: not providing services to a website is tantamount to refusing to administer potentially life-saving emergency aid, while the harms of persistent and targeted harassment are reduced to a judgment on “moral character”. And while companies can rely on their willingness to act in accordance with legal process, shifting the burden entirely onto the court system ignores the fact that law enforcement agencies and Courts have an abysmal record of not only ignoring harm reported by communities that are frequent targets of online abuse, but also causing further harm in the process.

A frequently expressed concern is that denying services to a bad actor is a “slippery slope” leading to denial of services to anyone, including marginalized communities often targeted by forums like 8chan. So far, that has not been the case. While Cloudflare claims its high-profile decisions to end services for 8chan and the daily storm has led to “a dramatic increase in authoritarian regimes trying to get us to terminate the security services of human rights organizations”, it is unclear whether any of these demands are reflected in the corporate transparency reports. Greater transparency is needed throughout the stack for a well-informed public conversation to be possible. But it is equally important to consider how and when the “slippery slope” arguments are applied. Cloudflare says its latest withdrawal decision was made because the escalation of threats – in just forty-eight hours – led the company to believe there was “unprecedented urgency and an immediate threat to life. human”. The slope from “revolting content” to the harassment, swatting and mass shootings encouraged by online hate communities also seems awfully slippery.

Trying to untangle complex political issues in times of crisis is impractical – but so is continuing to insist on the existence of neutral actors.

There are two things those who care about creating a safe and thriving digital world have learned from watching the long and drawn-out conversation about moderating social media content. For one thing, there are few, if any, easy answers. This is just as true for internet infrastructure services as it is for major social media platforms. And second, problems don’t solve themselves or go away — tech companies react to public outcry and investigative journalism that makes them look bad. Trying to untangle complex political issues in times of crisis is impractical – but so is continuing to insist on the existence of neutral actors.

There is no doubt that these horrible corners of the internet will persist – in some form or in a forum. There will always be places on the web where those determined to cause harm and perpetuate abuse can band together and build new outposts. Combating these harms clearly requires a whole-of-society approach, but Internet infrastructure providers are as much a part of society and the online ecosystem as the rest of us. An honest and solid conversation about the real consequences of allowing hate communities to grow online and how internet infrastructure companies allow them to do so is the only path to an internet where diverse communities can create and thrive safely.

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B’nai Brith Launches 2022 Quebec Election Guide https://handfulofhate.com/bnai-brith-launches-2022-quebec-election-guide/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 21:32:07 +0000 https://handfulofhate.com/bnai-brith-launches-2022-quebec-election-guide/ MONTREAL – B’nai Brith Canada announces the launch of its Quebec election information page at bnaibrith.ca to help voters better understand the choices available to them when they go to the polls on 3 October. The page of our website contains links to the platforms of the parties represented in the National Assembly and to […]]]>

MONTREAL – B’nai Brith Canada announces the launch of its Quebec election information page at bnaibrith.ca to help voters better understand the choices available to them when they go to the polls on 3 October.

The page of our website contains links to the platforms of the parties represented in the National Assembly and to the new parties presenting candidates for the first time. It also provides information on candidate debates, political party positions and where to vote.

The five main political parties participating in the election are: Coalition Avenir Québec; Liberal Party; the Parti Québécois; Québec solidaire; the Conservative Party of Quebec. Two new parties, the Bloc Montreal and the Canadian Party of Quebec also entered the fray. The Coalition Avenir Québec won the 2018 election, overthrowing the Liberal Party after the Liberals served only one term.

B’nai Brith’s intention is to provide information that will enable voters to make an informed choice. For the past decade, the organization has provided electoral information on major federal, provincial and municipal elections through its website.

CLICK HERE to visit our site on the elections in Quebec and learn more about the parties.

“We will update the page from time to time throughout the campaign and invite parties to provide any additional information about their platforms that they feel is relevant to the Jewish community in the province,” said Michael Mostyn, Director General of B’nai Brith Canada. Officer. “B’nai Brith will not endorse any party, but we will share relevant information with Quebec voters.

Of note for the Jewish community, although the The Government of Quebec has adopted the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) definition of antisemitism, a similar motion presented to the National Assembly in 2021 was not adopted, since Québec solidaire was the only dissenter. On the other hand, the leader of the Bloc Québécois, Yves-François Blanchet said his party “unconditionally adheres” to the IHRA definition.

Canada is one of 45 democratic member countries of the IHRA and use its definition of anti-Semitism to combat hate. Twenty US states and the province of Ontario have officially adopted the IHRA.

B’nai Brith also notes that Quebec Solidaire endorsed the BDS movement in November 2009 and was among the first to call on Israel a apartheid state.

“A House of Commons Standing Committee recently said that anti-Zionism and the refusal to recognize the right of Jews to self-determination in land where Jews have been indigenous for 3,000 years is one of the main drivers of the global anti-Semitism,” said Marvin Rotrand, Country Director. of the League for Human Rights of B’nai Brith Canada. “The Committee recommended that the Government of Canada do all it can to oppose the demonization and delegitimization of Israel.

B’nai Brith has long since made public his opposition to Bills 96 and 21laws that he considers detrimental to the interests of the Jewish population of Quebec.

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Plot: United Airlines hates surfers https://handfulofhate.com/plot-united-airlines-hates-surfers/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 03:07:44 +0000 https://handfulofhate.com/plot-united-airlines-hates-surfers/ Heavy birds have trouble flying. The same goes for metal birds (planes). In fact, in aeronautics, there is a term for it: maximum takeoff weight (MTOW). MTOW is the maximum weight at which the pilot is allowed to attempt takeoff, due to structural or other limitations. Important to know if you do not want to […]]]>

Heavy birds have trouble flying.

The same goes for metal birds (planes). In fact, in aeronautics, there is a term for it: maximum takeoff weight (MTOW). MTOW is the maximum weight at which the pilot is allowed to attempt takeoff, due to structural or other limitations.

Important to know if you do not want to suffer the fate of the Dodo.

Recently, United Airlines revamped a two-board-only policy that has nothing to do with calculating MTOW, and everything to do with punishing surfers traveling with quivers of mas de tres.

It’s not just about paying an excess for extra weight, it’s a detailed cap on how many boards you can take, whether or not you meet the relevant weight requirements. i.e. bring five boards? Say goodbye to three.

Challenger Series surfer Eli Hanneman was one of the first victims of UA’s new surfboard policy, and nobly gave a warning croak to warn others of the danger.

By its GI:

“I hate to be that guy who complains about things on social media, but consider this a letter of recommendation to never fly @united as a surfer. Guess they decided to revamp the 2 board policy per board bag (regardless of it being less than 50 pounds) that other airlines burned down a few years ago Long story short, by booking this flight I thought I could pay a fee for the extra boards in my board bag but they told me there was a two board limit and it was non-negotiable I opened my suitcase and started counting the number of shirts and shorts I had in it but then they told me it was ridiculous But apparently it’s not ridiculous if I count the number of boards in my board bag 🤔 PS I asked the receptionist and she said this policy if for international travel too it looks like I’m going to Ericeira with 2 boards 🤙🏽 🤙🏽

As if the air travel shitstorm of 2022 needed another stressor.

Even more annoying, there is nothing on their customer service page notifying visitors of the changes to this policy, meaning visitors are tricked into registering before they can sort out other arrangements.

Old school one way cul-de-sac.

As one, we are the last Dodo. Together we are a set of screaming magpies.

Let’s make some noise, it won’t fly.

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As the thermometer rises, hate speech also rises on Twitter https://handfulofhate.com/as-the-thermometer-rises-hate-speech-also-rises-on-twitter/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 14:30:00 +0000 https://handfulofhate.com/as-the-thermometer-rises-hate-speech-also-rises-on-twitter/ THURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2022 (HealthDay News) — Internet hotheads are often quite literally that, with hateful tweets increasing in number as temperatures soar, a new study reports. Temperatures above 86 degrees Fahrenheit are consistently linked to a surge in hate messages online, according to a review of more than 4 billion tweets in English. The […]]]>

THURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2022 (HealthDay News) — Internet hotheads are often quite literally that, with hateful tweets increasing in number as temperatures soar, a new study reports.

Temperatures above 86 degrees Fahrenheit are consistently linked to a surge in hate messages online, according to a review of more than 4 billion tweets in English.

The researchers identified a “wellness window” between 54 and 70 degrees where hateful tweets occurred less often, including a 59 to 65 degree window that represented the least hateful social message.

“Even in high-income areas where people can afford air conditioning and other heat-mitigating options, we are seeing an increase in hate speech on extremely hot days. In other words: there is a limit to what people can take,” study co-author Anders Levermann said in a press release from the Potsdam Institute for Impact Research. in Germany, where he heads the division of complexity sciences.

For the study, researchers used a computer program to identify approximately 75 million hateful tweets out of more than 4 billion tweets posted on Twitter in the United States between 2014 and 2020. Hate speech was defined as discriminatory language based on religion, ethnicity, nationality, race, color, ancestry, gender or other identity factor.

The researchers then linked the tweets to weather conditions, to see how the number of hateful tweets changed as local temperatures rose or fell.

Outside of this wellness window, online hate messages increased by up to 22% for warmer temperatures and up to 12% for colder temperatures in the United States, investigators found.

Hate speech online can seriously threaten someone’s mental health, the researchers noted.

“Our findings highlight online hate speech as a new impact channel through which climate change can affect overall societal cohesion and people’s mental health,” said lead researcher Leonie Wenz, group leader of work at the Potsdam Institute. “So that means that cutting emissions very quickly and drastically will not only benefit the outside world. Protecting our climate from excessive global warming is also essential for our mental health.

The study results were published Sept. 7 in The Lancet Planetary Health.

More information

The Natural Resources Defense Council has more to say about the mental health consequences of heat.

SOURCE: Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, press release, September 7, 2022

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Have you been a victim of or witness to a homosexual hate crime in Sydney between 1970 and 2010? The survey wants to know https://handfulofhate.com/have-you-been-a-victim-of-or-witness-to-a-homosexual-hate-crime-in-sydney-between-1970-and-2010-the-survey-wants-to-know/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 04:08:50 +0000 https://handfulofhate.com/have-you-been-a-victim-of-or-witness-to-a-homosexual-hate-crime-in-sydney-between-1970-and-2010-the-survey-wants-to-know/ The deaths of Wendy Wayne Brennan, Ross Warren and Gilles Mattaini are among 88 unsolved deaths of gay and transgender women in New South Wales between 1970 and 2010. Gilles Mattaini, a French national living in Bondi, was last seen by a neighbor near Marks Park, a well-known gay area in Sydney, in September 1985. […]]]>

Gilles Mattaini, a French national living in Bondi, was last seen by a neighbor near Marks Park, a well-known gay area in Sydney, in September 1985. He was not reported missing until 2002. In 2005, a coroner determined that Mattani was dead. and was likely murdered like TV presenter Ross Warren and gay bartender John Russell, who were killed at the same gay beat a few years later.

Wendy Wayne Brennan, a transgender flirt, was found dead in her Darlinghurst Road flat, hit in the head with a heavy object and shot twice in the head in April 1995.

Trigger Warning: This story deals with anti-gay and anti-trans hate crimes, which may be distressing for some readers. For 24-hour crisis support and suicide prevention call Lifeline on 13 11 14. For Australia-wide LGBTQI peer support call QLife on 1800 184 527 or live chat.

These are just some of the 88 unsolved murders of gay men and transgender women over a 40-year period, with most incidents dating from the early 1980s to the mid-1990s.

A Special Commission of Inquiry into LGBTQI Hate Crimes, which was set up by the NSW Government in April 2022, launched a public appeal for information on Tuesday. The special commission headed by Judge John Sackar is looking into the 88 unsolved deaths that were considered by NSW Police in their 2018 Parrabell Strike Force report and by a parliamentary committee in 2021.

Unsolved death and missing person cases

Some of the victims of gay hate crimes in Sydney between 1970 and 2010.

“In addition to reviewing these cases, the Special Commission is also assessing many other unsolved death and missing persons cases during the same time period, to shed more light on a dark time for LGBTIQ people in this state. “, the commission said in a statement.

The commission of inquiry has its work cut out for it and is currently analyzing more than 100,000 documents, including police records, coroners’ files and other information spanning more than 40 years. .

According to Peter Gray, lead attorney in charge of the investigation, the commission is also seeking any information from the public, including family and friends of victims and witnesses.

“Any memories or pieces of information you may have, whether major or minor, could provide a vital link to understanding what happened. In some cases, this can ultimately lead to arrests and lawsuits,” Gray said in a statement.

“Justice in these cases has been long delayed and long overdue. This may be the last chance for the truth about some of these historic deaths to come to light. We need to hear from you.

Last chance to speak

Scott White (right, handcuffed) was arrested in 2021 for the 1988 gay heinous murder of American mathematician Scott Johnson (left).

In May 2022 Scott White was convicted and jailed for the murder of US national Scott Johnson, who was found dead at the base of a cliff near Manly’s North Head in December 1988. White was arrested last year after that his ex-wife came forward to report that he bragged about bashing gay people in the 1980s. White admitted guilt in court.

Earlier this month Stanley Early, a 76-year-old Melbourne man, was charged with the alleged ‘gay hate’ murder of Raymond Keam in a Sydney park in 1987.

The commission hopes that its public call for information will lead witnesses or even defendants to provide information out of guilt.

Gray called on anyone who may have witnessed or participated in these murders of LGBTQI people to come forward.

“If you’ve had something stuck in your head for years about these things, now is your chance to do something to make amends. Now is the time to break your silence,” Gray said.

The commission is scheduled to hold public hearings in October-November 2022, with further hearings in the first half of 2023. Judge Sackar is expected to deliver his final report to the governor no later than June 30, 2023.

If you have information about anti-gay and anti-trans hate crimes that occurred between 1970 and 2010 in New South Wales, you can contact:

If you feel distressed while reading the story, you can contact support services.

For 24-hour crisis support and suicide prevention, call Lifeline on 13 11 14

For Australia-wide LGBTQI peer support call QLife on 1800 184 527 or live chat.

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Son of Buffalo shooting victim fears death penalty could make suspect a ‘martyr’ | National https://handfulofhate.com/son-of-buffalo-shooting-victim-fears-death-penalty-could-make-suspect-a-martyr-national/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 13:25:42 +0000 https://handfulofhate.com/son-of-buffalo-shooting-victim-fears-death-penalty-could-make-suspect-a-martyr-national/ Alysha Webb/ABC News (BUFFALO, NY) – As federal prosecutors consider whether to seek the death penalty for the suspect in the Buffalo, New York, racially motivated shooting that left 10 black people dead, the son of the One of the victims told ABC News he doesn’t want to see the alleged teenage shooter made a […]]]>

Alysha Webb/ABC News

(BUFFALO, NY) – As federal prosecutors consider whether to seek the death penalty for the suspect in the Buffalo, New York, racially motivated shooting that left 10 black people dead, the son of the One of the victims told ABC News he doesn’t want to see the alleged teenage shooter made a martyr.

Wayne Jones, the only child of Celestine Chaney, 65, one of those killed in the May 14 mass shooting, said he would rather see the white suspect, Payton Gendron, 19, spend the rest of his life behind bars.

“When you see him in court, he’s a kid. You can tell he’s a kid and whether he tells anybody or not, you can see it on his face, ‘I really messed up,'” Jones, 49, the father of six, told ABC News. “So, for me, I would prefer him to stay behind bars for the rest of his life. If you kill him, he becomes a martyr.”

As Jones spoke, a new federal Joint Intelligence Bulletin obtained by ABC News warns that public disclosure of Gendron’s nearly 700-page online diary is likely to enhance the ability of copycat attackers.

The document from the FBI’s National Counterterrorism Center and Department of Homeland Security said the tactics, techniques and procedures Gendron allegedly wrote about “could contribute to today’s threat landscape” as they represent a “practical guide to future attackers.

“The DHS, FBI and NCTC (The National Counterterrorism Center) believe that the dissemination of written guidelines outlining the tactics, techniques and procedures used by the alleged Buffalo attacker will likely improve the abilities of potential mass shooters who may be inspired by this attack,” the statement said.

Gendron is accused of planning the massacre for months — including going to the store, more than a three-hour drive from his home in Conklin, New York — to sketch out the layout and count the number of black people present, said federal prosecutors. Gendron was allegedly motivated by a far-right, racist conspiracy known as the Replacement Theory and he wanted to “inspire others to carry out similar attacks,” according to a federal criminal complaint.

Increase in attacks against the black community

But Garnell Whitfield Jr., the former Buffalo fire marshal whose 86-year-old mother, Ruth Whitfield, was the oldest victim killed in the rampage, told ABC News of an upsurge in attacks on the black community, fueled by what he described as an increase in racist rhetoric from right-wing leaders, was happening long before the murderous Buffalo rampage.

In 2015, white supremacist Dylann Roof murdered nine black members of the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina during a Bible study. Roof, who was convicted of federal hate crimes and sentenced to death, confessed that he wanted to start a race war.

In 2017, avowed white supremacist James Alex Fields Jr. deliberately drove his car into a crowd of anti-racism protesters at a rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, killing a woman and injuring dozens of others. Fields, who pleaded guilty to 29 of 30 federal hate crimes, was sentenced to life in prison. He was also convicted of murder by the state.

According to FBI statistics, the number of reported hate crimes against black people in America in 2020 was 2,871, up from 1,972 in 2019.

Whitfield said he’d rather spend his time focusing on the dynamics behind the rise in hate crimes rather than the teenager charged in the Tops store rampage.

“But look, it’s not about this guy. This guy is an insignificant pawn used by the powers that be, by the system that is, to do their dirty work, OK,” Whitfield said of Gendron. , refusing to say his name. “So I’m not going to focus on him. He’s in custody.”

He added: “He’s definitely going to get whatever he gets. I don’t care if he gets the death penalty or not. I don’t really care about him. I’m not going to spend my time talking about him or focusing on him. The truth is that I focus on the things that empowered him and why he became who he was. The systems and people that continue to be in power to this day and who continue to victimize us all.”

“I don’t wish death on anyone”: the best survivor of the shooting

Fragrance Harris Stanfield, a Tops employee who survived the shooting, also told ABC News she was against killing anyone.

“I mean obviously he shouldn’t be released. Whether he gets the death penalty or not, that’s not something I would think about. I’m not in death like that. I don’t wish death on anyone for any reason,” said Harris Stanfield, a mother of seven who calls herself a devout Muslim.

A Buffalo Public Schools educator, who worked at Tops as a second job to make ends meet, Harris Stanfield said she’s grateful the federal charges against the suspect have been updated to include victims like her who don’t Were not physically injured in the shooting. but were traumatized by what they experienced.

Harris Stanfield said she was grateful federal prosecutors listened to her when she expressed concern that charges were not initially filed on behalf of victims who were not killed or injured. She said when she saw the first charges against the suspect she was “distressed again”.

“I felt like there was a whole different set of trauma given that it was just for people who were shot or people who were killed,” Harris Stanfield said. “All others were not included.”

The 27-count federal indictment charges Gendron with 14 violations of the Hate Crimes Prevention Act of Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr., including 10 counts of hate crimes resulting in death, three counts of hate crimes involving an attempt to kill three injured people, and one count of hate crimes alleging the suspect attempted to kill other black people in and around Tops’ grocery store. He is also charged with 13 firearms offences.

Like Jones, Whitfield said he attended several court hearings for Gendron and concluded, “He is also a victim.

“He’s just too dumb and ignorant to know that. His whole problem, if you read his manifesto, he’s been ostracized and bullied his whole life, he felt,” Whitfield said. “It wasn’t by black people. No black people live near him. They were mean people, but they weren’t black people. He had no reason to channel, but they helped him to channel that anger back to us. It’s an afterthought. If I had a choice, would I do something to her? Probably for hurting my mom. But the most important thing to me is the systems that we’ve all lived with, that we’ve all suffered with. And that’s where I want to focus my energy.”

Whitfield said he would like to see a serious dialogue in America about the rise of white supremacy, but doubts that will happen because “it’s not practical.”

“You should recognize that your ancestors enslaved my ancestors and built this country on our backs. You should recognize all these things. You should recognize the lies you were taught. And you should recognize the flaws of your ancestors, of your belief system. You would have to deal with all of that. And it’s uncomfortable,” Whitfield said.

Suspect was ‘a kid on the internet for years’

Meanwhile, Jones said he believed Gendron could be more useful in combating future racially motivated attacks if he was kept alive.

“Let him just sit there and let him think like I have to keep thinking. For the rest of my life I have to think about it. My mother is gone. So the rest of his life he needs thinking, ‘I can’t kiss my mom because I did this and I’m here.’ So that’s the outcome I would like,” Jones told ABC News. “I know some people want the death penalty for him. Probably if I was younger that’s probably how I would do it. But I have kids. I’ve had 18-year-olds and you “Make a lot of mistakes when you’re younger. He made a big one. But he doesn’t strike me as a hard-core terrorist.”

He said that ideally he would like to see a program in which others who think they are following in the suspect’s footsteps are brought to jail to speak with him, so he can tell them, “don’t get caught up in what I’m ‘have done”.

Jones agrees with Whitfield that Gendron was not just a lone wolf.

“He’s just sitting with his head down. He could be brainwashed. You’ve been talking about a kid on the internet for years,” Jones said. “Somebody brainwashed him or convinced him to, gave him the idea and fed him about black people taking over and this and that.”

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Former South Park writer, actor slams Governor Abbott on parody website https://handfulofhate.com/former-south-park-writer-actor-slams-governor-abbott-on-parody-website/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://handfulofhate.com/former-south-park-writer-actor-slams-governor-abbott-on-parody-website/ If you go to the Governorgregabbott.com website, you’ll find what looks like a disturbing admission of guilt in the “About” section. “I am partly responsible for the deaths of students killed in school shootings,” the page read. “My current goal is to make sure you forget about the clusterfuck called Uvalde.” (In May, the mass […]]]>

If you go to the Governorgregabbott.com website, you’ll find what looks like a disturbing admission of guilt in the “About” section.

“I am partly responsible for the deaths of students killed in school shootings,” the page read. “My current goal is to make sure you forget about the clusterfuck called Uvalde.” (In May, the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde killed 19 students and two teachers.)

Despite what the site’s address might suggest, it is not affiliated with Texas Governor Greg Abbott or his campaign. It’s the brainchild of comedy writer Toby Morton, who’s worked for the likes of South Park and mad tv. In recent years, Morton has scooped up domain names associated with several Republican politicians and campaigned to create parody websites slamming them all.

There’s thelaurenboebert.com, Senatormarcorubio.com, and then there’s Governorgregabbott.com, which Morton says gets the most traffic. “Lots of love from the Texans on this one,” he told the Observer. The bottom of each page of each site indicates that it is a parody.

When you open the Abbott parody site, you will be greeted with a photo of the Governor and a text box that says “Failures of Governor Abbott. People are dying under his watch. The site digs into the governor for everything from his leadership during winter storm Uri to his stances on gun control and reproductive rights. Much of what is written is presented as if written by the Governor himself.

“Of course, your lives are in danger because of a clandestine abortion, but think about it…it could be worse.” – governorgregabbott.com

Tweet that

“The United States Supreme Court correctly overruled Roe v. Wade and restored the right of states to protect innocent unborn children. And you women? Calm down,” the site reads. “Stop overreacting. You won’t need abortions anymore since you won’t be raped in Texas anymore because I outlaw rape! Of course, your lives are in danger because of a clandestine abortion, but think about it…it could be worse.

Morton said no one from Abbott’s office or his campaign contacted the Texas governor’s parody site. Instead, he gets “a lot of random hate mail,” Morton said. Recently he posted an email from an angry visitor to the site.

“I am a proud woman from Texas,” the person wrote. “I see so many working hard to make sure Texas stays true to God. What you’re doing with the domain and website you’ve created is putting evil in the lives of those hard-working Texans.

The email continued: “Your website only sows doubt in the minds of voters. You make decisions for them. It ended with Morton being told he was a disappointment to the state and should seek forgiveness.

While no one in Abbott’s office or campaign contacted Morton, U.S. Representative Lauren Boebert’s office sent a cease and desist email to the parody site about him.

Morton posted it on the site, which is still online today.

“The website … should be removed as the photos here are the property of the US federal government,” the email from Boebert’s publicist said. “Furthermore, the entire website is a defamatory impersonation, and it violates the relevant terms of use and US law. Please remove immediately or face other action.

Morton later told the media, “I think they just wanted to scare me, so they sent this stupid email.”

Nothing ever came of the cease and desist email. Neither the governor’s office nor his campaign responded to requests for comment on whether they had similar concerns about Abbott’s parody site.

Morton plans to keep the parody sites going, and with the election fast approaching in November, he said he’s been busier than usual. He gets more attention from the Abbott site than any other, and he attributes that to recent state action on gun control and abortion.

Websites are Morton’s main line of work, but he recently launched a political satire podcast called Maximum News. He said he was keeping the sites as up-to-date as possible and would release two parody ads for Abbott’s campaign in the coming weeks.

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Birbal, Roshanara and Ruqaiya enter Instagram page and break hatred towards Mughals with memes https://handfulofhate.com/birbal-roshanara-and-ruqaiya-enter-instagram-page-and-break-hatred-towards-mughals-with-memes/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 05:49:51 +0000 https://handfulofhate.com/birbal-roshanara-and-ruqaiya-enter-instagram-page-and-break-hatred-towards-mughals-with-memes/ New Delhi: When admin Birbal took to Instagram to post a curated list of books for Mad Mughal Memes on November 9, 2019, he noticed some unusual activity. Notifications were blaring and DMs were flooded with hate – “We will find you. You will have to pay for it,” one message read. That evening, however, […]]]>

New Delhi: When admin Birbal took to Instagram to post a curated list of books for Mad Mughal Memes on November 9, 2019, he noticed some unusual activity. Notifications were blaring and DMs were flooded with hate – “We will find you. You will have to pay for it,” one message read.

That evening, however, everything seemed abnormally noisy. The Supreme Court has rendered a verdict in the Ram Janmabhoomi-Babri Masjid case. India was at a standstill and many schools and colleges were closed. People were anticipating violence in the streets, and social media, in particular, was burning with hatred. It was a day when everything Mughal was the target. How could a meme page escape it?

Over the past seven years, the Mughal Memes page on Instagram and Facebook has attempted to push back against the daily hatred and vilification of Mughal leaders, making them more accessible and delivering a story with a tinge of humor. Memes have now become their everyday mode of resistance.

“The Mughals weren’t all gunpowder, wars and nautch girls. They were great patrons of the arts and had an unparalleled cultural sensitivity,” Birbal said. Bollywood and contemporary works do not do them justice.

Gateway to Mughal History

India is going through unprecedented whims in history. Many historical figures are drawn into the polarizing politics of 21st century India. And Mughal rulers are the favorite punching bag and trigger words of some Hindus today. What started out as hatred for Babur and Aurangzeb didn’t even spare Akbar anymore. There is resentment being expressed – not just on social media, but even by people such as Bollywood stars Akshay Kumar and Anupam Kher – over what many see as an over-focus of Indian textbooks on the Mughal period. to the detriment of the Hindu kingdoms.

But Mad Mughal Memes on Instagram is trying to change this meme at once. This is when even small efforts to publish facts or teach Mughal history can be considered bold acts. From death threats to doxing warnings to having their accounts near-deleted, these admins have faced criticism from all corners. Online hatred and ridicule have become part of their lives.

What began as a seven-member team’s ambition to impart knowledge and spread passion for Mughal history quickly became the go-to page. Mad Mughal Memes has amassed over 3,00,000 followers on Facebook and 28,000 on Instagram, including big names like William Dalrymple, Rana Safvi, Ira Mukhoty and Manu S. Pillai.

“It’s part of our existence, it’s something we get oxygen from,” Admin Birbal said. The hatred and ridicule they face inspires them to come back stronger. “Despite the hate, we believe that those who troll us are a microscopic minority of those who like us and our content,” says Birbal.

It all started with admin Babur who launched the page on Facebook. Then came the others with a shared love for history and memes. “Memes are like science, which in the right hands can create wonders. They can also be used for propaganda purposes and to fuel hatred. It’s as dangerous as misinformation,” Birbal said.

Administrators of Mad Mughal Memes include Babur, a teacher, Zauq, an IT professional who previously worked with Google, Ruqqaya, a young lawyer, Roshanara, a postgraduate student, and Shahjahan, a Ph.D. candidate. The admins all have day jobs, but they regularly brainstorm for witty memes. They work remotely and are based in different cities in India and Southeast Asia.

The administrators chose to remain anonymous for security reasons, including because of the Hate Squad hunting them down for their “alleged glorification of Muslim invaders.” But now they have started to like hiding behind the veil of anonymity. “It’s our secret identity as Batman,” Birbal said.

Most of their friends and relatives have no idea about their secret lives online as history guerrillas. It started as a one hour daily job but now Mad Mughal Memes are taking more and more space in their waking hours, life and mental space.

They barely have time to set up online meetings but stay connected on WhatsApp to brainstorm and discuss feedback. Their small victories come in the form of people saying, “This is how history should be taught. Admin Birbal particularly appreciates his students using memes in their class discussions and presentations.

Admin Birbal has also recently started using memes at lectures to showcase some key events in Indian history, and students are taking advantage of this. “It gives them a break from their textbooks,” he said.

Meme arranged by Akansha Sengupta | Mad Mughal Memes/Facebook

The above meme highlights Mir Jafar’s betrayal during the Battle of Plassey in 1757 when he sided with the East India Company behind Siraj ud-Daulah’s back.

“I meet a lot of people who want a quick way to learn history and are often led to misinformation on the internet. History shouldn’t be boring for anyone, and the admins of Mad Mughal Memes are doing a great job to bust the myths,” says Suranya Sengupta, author and history buff.


Read also : Jahnvi Emojis, Malaika at the Gym, Urfi at the Airport: Paparazzi’s Secret Bollywood Handshake


Bringing the era of medieval India to life

Along with the witty memes, they also created a fun fictional diary called The era of medieval India.

medieval indian times |  Mad Mughal Memes/Facebook
medieval indian times | Mad Mughal Memes/Facebook

Through this, Mad Mughal Memes admins tried to dramatize the subplots of the story, and the followers love it.

“Sometimes we come up with a really clever meme that surprises us too. But we don’t get the response we expect. We post it, and it gets 30-50 likes in an hour. So with an online audience, content is equally a hit or miss. Other times, the weirdest things become popular,” says Birbal.

Gen Z finds Ravish Kumar fascinating because of the way he reports big news. Birbal tried to bring Ravish Kumar’s ingenious grounding ability to life through the Functional Diary. The “typical” of Ravish Kumardarr ka mahol hai“Comments raised during prime-time TV debates have turned into meme-worthy content for many.

medieval indian times |  Mad Mughal Memes/Facebook
medieval indian times | Mad Mughal Memes/Facebook

Ravish Kumar’s comment in The era of medieval India is fun . Now, fans ask for “Ravish Kumar” on every edition of the newspaper. Another fan favorite is Abdul Qadir Badayuni, the first “Grand Mufti of India”, a historian in Akbar’s court. His ever-standing dialogue “Blasphemy, Madness” is a running gag. The idea behind Badayuni’s inclusion was to portray his annoyance with Akbar’s religious policies – he hated Akbar’s liberalism and did not consider him a “good Muslim”.

For Badayuni, a good Muslim would never abolish the jizya, a pilgrimage tax levied on non-Muslims. This is why Akbar was the “walking motive of blasphemy”. Unlike the “Babur ki auladA policy propelled by the Yogi Adityanath government, Mad Mughal Memes is on a quest to portray an alternative image of Mughals.

Despite the great popularity of “Ravish Kumar” and Badayuni among followers of Mad Mughal Memes, nothing triumphs over Humayun memes. Administrators did not spare the Mughal Emperor’s death by falling from the stairs of his library: memes say that the stairs were a bigger antagonist in Humayun’s life than Sher Shah Suri himself.

Meme arranged by Akansha Sengupta |  Mad Mughal Memes/Facebook
Meme arranged by Akansha Sengupta | Mad Mughal Memes/Facebook

Here, Mirza Kamran, Humayun’s brother is making a dig at Humayun. They also referred to Jahangir’s alcoholism.


Read also : How the cheetah, a hunting ally of the Mughals and the “vermin” of the British Raj, died out in India


Mughal Games Podcasts

Mad Mughal Memes admins are constantly scouring pop culture references and contemporary news to create relevant content for their audience.

In addition to keeping the story debates going, they also started other gigs. They launched the Mad Mughal Memes podcast and recorded episodes with Rana Safvi, discussing her recent book A Snot, a folk Jbeer and other stories: Lesser known monuments with India. They also spoke with actor Charu Shankar, best known for playing Nur Jahan in his period drama, Siyasat was released in 2017. They talked about the popularity of the drama, screenplay, and female portrayal in the story.

Mad Mughal Memes is also set to collaborate with SemiMyth Entertainment, a software game company. Their latest venture is to create a strategy game based on medieval South Asian history.

Now on Imran Khan’s Instagram

Mad Mughal Memes are only getting stronger, but their “I did it” moment was filled with shock and confusion because former Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan “stole” their post.

Birbal had written a small article about Tipu Sultan and posted it on Instagram. Just a day later, the post was on Imran Khan’s Instagram feed. Birbal was told by a follower, “Deko kaun kiya tumhara chori post (Look who stole your post).

“I had mixed feelings, I was sad and angry, but strangely happy because a world leader noticed our work. We were hysterical because it was content theft from a world leader But we’re going to give him some slack given his dramatic ousting,” Birbal said.

Birbal and Ruqaiya, who run Instagram, are torn between speaking to Khan’s social media team or settling the case in the International Court of Justice.

(Edited by Humra Laeeq)

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